Archive for category Eustress

Get Fit For Life!

AH THE PROMISE OF WASHBOARD ABS AND SCULPTED PECS. After eight long hours hunched over our desks, it’s enough to push us to drop the day’s earnings on fancy elliptical trainersw and treadmills, only to leave them languishing in closets collecting dust, along with our best intentions.

While a grueling workout may harden the bodies of those with rock-hard willpower, there’s good news for the rest of us.  The latest findings from the field of exercise science reveal that moderate exercise has a host of benefits, including a healthier heart and brain, and potentially even a longer life.

GET A MOVE ON

Mounting evidence that sitting still for too long is harmful to your health

couch potato“YOUR TV IS SLOWLY KILLING YOU,” screams one headline.  “Sitting for hours can shave years off your life,” says another.  What started with a few interesting studies has turned into a barrage of alarming media reports on the dangers of sedentary behavior.  Last year, the Journal of the American College of Cardiology reported that people who spend four hours a day on screen based activities – computers, video games and television – are twice as likely to have a major cardiac event, such as a heart attack, than those who spend two hours or less sitting still. Another paper compared the mortality records and TV-viewing habits of 11,247 Australians and found that each hour of screen time clipped 22 minutes off study participants’ lives.  More sobering still: the lives of those who spent six hours a day glued to the screen were 4.8 years shorter.

While you rush to lace up your cross-trainers, here’s the real clincher: according to the latest findings, even a daily workout isn’t enough to offset the negative effects of sitting motionless for hours. The solution, researchers say, is to incorporate some movement – any movement at all – into your daily routine.

DESKERCISE

Simple strategies for keeping active on the job

  • Sit on an exercise ball.  A University of Buffalo study says you’ll burn six percent more calories than when sitting in a chair.
  • Stand up when you talk on your smartphone.  Better yet, take a walk.  The more breaks you take from your chair, the trimmer your waistline will be, according to a 2011 report in the European Heart Journal.
  • Stop e-mailing the guy in the next cubicle.  When the next big idea pops into your head, walk over to your coworkers and share it with them in person.
  • Take frequent and regular breaks.  Free downloadable programs like workrave.com remind you when it’s time to get moving.
  • Ask your boss for a stand-up workstation. Some ergonomically designed desks can electronically adjust to varying heights.

deskercise-exercise-ball“The potential adverse health impact of prolonged sitting (which is something we do on average for more than half of each day) is only just being realized. Even small changes, which could be as little as standing up for one minute, might help lower this risk.” – Dr. Genevieve Healy, School of Population Health, The University of Queensland, Australia

EXERCISE AND THE BRAIN

HEALTHY BODY, HEALTHY MIND

What’s good for the heart is good for the brain

WHILE WE KNOW A GOOD WORKOUT can work magic on our bodies, we tend to underestimate the impact exercise has on our brains: reducing stress, enhancing mood, improving focus and decision making ability and stimulating the brain-cell growth that is key to learning.  That’s not all: what gets man neuroscientists up at the crack of dawn for a morning run is growing proof that exercise fuels the brain throughout all stages of life.  Where we once believed there’s no escaping the mind’s inevitable atrophy as we grow old, the advancing neuroimaging techniques such as MRIs show that older people who squeeze in a daily bike ride or a few laps around the pool actually revers the shrinkage of structures that are key to brain health. If this news doesn’t send boomers everywhere running to aquafit class, perhaps they’re having a “senior moment”.

woman stretchingBRAIN PLEASERS

  • Researchers recently put one group of sedentary older adults through a year of modest aerobic exercise and tracked two significant results: an increase in the size of the hippocampus deep inside the brain and gradual improvement on memory tests.
  • Both aerobic exercise and strength training play a role in maintaining a healthy brain throughout life, according to a recent review of 111 studies in the field of exercise neuroscience.

“If you are in middle age and begin to exercise at a moderate intensity, which means you’re sweating and a little bit breathless for 30 or 40 minutes a day, three to four times a week, you will push back cognitive decline by 10 to 15 years.  Some studies say the same kind of regimen can cut the incidence of Alzheimer’s disease in your life by about a third.” – Dr. John Ratey, associate clinical professor of psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, and author of Spark: The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain

HOW MUCH EXERCISE?

FITNESS CALCULATOR

How day-to-day tasks help keep you in shape

RESEARCHERS HAVE A FORMULA that compares various physical activities with the energy cost of quiet sitting. Measurements are in metabolic equivalent of tasks (METS). The more METS, the better.

1) LIGHT ACTIVITY (1-3 METS)

  • Sitting quietly watching TV … 1.3
  • Watering lawn or garden … 1.5
  • Fishing from boat or canoe … 2.0
  • Washing / Waxing car … 2.0
  • Playing fold or classical guitar … 2.0

2) MODERATE ACTIVITY (3-6 METS)

  • Kitchen activity … 3.3
  • Painting house (interior) or furniture … 3.3
  • Power yoga … 4.0
  • Golf … 4.8

3) VIGOROUS ACTIVITY (more than 6 METS)

  • Bicycling to and from work … 6.8
  • Carrying groceries upstairs … 7.5
  • Running, 6 mpg … 9.8
  • Swimming laps, freestyle, fast … 9.8
  • Boxing … 12.8

Source: Medicine & Science in Sports and Exercise, 2011 Compendium of Physical Activities

MAN’S BEST FRIEND

There’s proof your pooch may be keeping you trim

TWO-THIRDS OF DOG OWNERS take their pets for regular walks, according to the 2011 report from Michigan State University. Nearly half (46 percent) of dog walkers exercise an average of 30 minutes a day, five days a week, while only one-third (38 percent) of Americans without dogs meet those standards.

Which is best, walking with your spouse or your dog? Experts at the University of Missouri compared human and dog walking companions and found that dog walkers showed much greater fitness improvements.

“There appears to be a strong link between owning and walking a dog and achieving higher levels of physical activity.” – Epidemiologist Mathew Reeves, Michigan State University

TIME CRUNCHED? NO PROBLEM

THIRTY MINUTES A DAY give five days a week, 150 minutes a week. For years we’ve been told that’s the bare minimum we need to get our hearts pumping if we want to reap any real health benefits from exercise.  Anything less just doesn’t count. A report published last summer in Britain’s prestigious medical journal, The Lancet, cut that Olympian effort in half.  Researchers tracked the health records of 416,175 active and inactive people for 12 years and discovered that people who exercised a mere 15 minutes a day had a 14 percent lower risk of death during the study than their couch potato peers.  Surprisingly, just a quarter-hour workout a day extended life expectancy by a whopping three years.  There’s more good news for those who’d rather burn their calories on the go than sweat their way through a punishing session of cardio boot camp.  New studies show that everyday activities such as gardening, moving the lawn and climbing the stairs also contribute to cardiovascular fitness, even if these takes last just a minute or two at a time.  So the next time you have to dash through the airport to catch a flight, imagine how great that little micro-burst of exertion is for your heart.  And whenever that infomercial for the Enormously Expensive Elliptical Exerciser comes on, why not save your pennies and walk the dog toward a healthier life?

 

  • Share/Bookmark

Tags: , ,

Love to Change? then Change to Love

Love to Change? then Change to Love

Love to Change? then Change to Love

Have you ever suffered pain in your life, physically, emotionally or mentally?
Do you often feel drained of energy and wondered WHY?
Inside I will reveal an easy, gentle and effective way of connecting and clearing what is holding you back from reaching your full potential

What is ‘Heart Art’?
Heart Art ‘Magic’ is painting from the subconscious, getting you in touch with your inner ‘thoughts’ and allowing you express what you are really feeling. It can bring forth the feeling so that you can look at how that Feeling is effecting your life
Awareness is the key to freedom
Have you ever suffered pain in your life, physically, emotionally or mentally?
Do you often feel drained of energy and wondered WHY?
Inside I will reveal an easy, gentle and effective way of connecting and clearing what is holding you back from reaching your full potential

What is ‘Heart Art’?
Heart Art ‘Magic’ is painting from the subconscious, getting you in touch with your inner ‘thoughts’ and allowing you express what you are really feeling. It can bring forth the feeling so that you can look at how that Feeling is effecting your life
Awareness is the key to freedom

List Price: $ 19.00

Price:

  • Share/Bookmark

Tags: ,

Schluss mit Stress! Stressbewältigung in 50 x 2 Minuten. (Sofortwissen kompakt) (German Edition)

Schluss mit Stress! Stressbewältigung in 50 x 2 Minuten. (Sofortwissen kompakt) (German Edition)

Schluss mit Stress! Stressbewältigung in 50 x 2 Minuten. (Sofortwissen kompakt) (German Edition)

Stress ist nicht immer etwas Negatives! Diese E-Book-Sonderausgabe des Kartensets bietet jede Menge Tipps und Anregungen für einen lockeren Umgang mit Stress.

1. Stress
2. Stressspirale
3. Stresssituationen
4. Stressreize
5. Stresstypen
6. Einstellungssache Stress
7. Stresstest
8. Burnout
9. Ihre Leistungskurve
10. Stressauslöser
11. Negativer Stress
12. Positiver Stress
13. Stressfolgen
14. Warnsignale
15. Stressursachen klären
16. Stress im Job
17. Finanzieller Stress
18. Stress bei Kleinigkeiten
19. Dauerärger
20. Beziehungsstress
21. Stress in der Familie
22. Prüfungsstress
23. Stress am Morgen
24. Stress im Auto
25. Stressfreie Gespräche
26. Stressfrei leben
27. Unterforderung
28. Balance
29. Beruf und Privates trennen
30. Soforthilfe
31. Richtig schlafen
32. Richtig entspannen
33. Atmen
34. Meditation
35. Muskelentspannung
36. Richtige Ernährung
37. Fitness
38. Entspannen mit Musik
39. Entspannung in 90 Sekunden
40. Den Tag planen
41. Prioritäten
42. Delegieren
43. Effektiver Arbeiten
44. Entschleunigen
45. Zeitdiebe
46. Spaß statt Stress
47. Selbstdisziplin
48. Auszeit nehmen
49. Wohlbefinden am Arbeitsplatz
50. Urlaub
51. Stress vermeiden
52. Statussymbol Stress
53. Lebensplanung

Stress ist nicht immer etwas Negatives! Diese E-Book-Sonderausgabe des Kartensets bietet jede Menge Tipps und Anregungen für einen lockeren Umgang mit Stress.

1. Stress
2. Stressspirale
3. Stresssituationen
4. Stressreize
5. Stresstypen
6. Einstellungssache Stress
7. Stresstest
8. Burnout
9. Ihre Leistungskurve
10. Stressauslöser
11. Negativer Stress
12. Positiver Stress
13. Stressfolgen
14. Warnsignale
15. Stressursachen klären
16. Stress im Job
17. Finanzieller Stress
18. Stress bei Kleinigkeiten
19. Dauerärger
20. Beziehungsstress
21. Stress in der Familie
22. Prüfungsstress
23. Stress am Morgen
24. Stress im Auto
25. Stressfreie Gespräche
26. Stressfrei leben
27. Unterforderung
28. Balance
29. Beruf und Privates trennen
30. Soforthilfe
31. Richtig schlafen
32. Richtig entspannen
33. Atmen
34. Meditation
35. Muskelentspannung
36. Richtige Ernährung
37. Fitness
38. Entspannen mit Musik
39. Entspannung in 90 Sekunden
40. Den Tag planen
41. Prioritäten
42. Delegieren
43. Effektiver Arbeiten
44. Entschleunigen
45. Zeitdiebe
46. Spaß statt Stress
47. Selbstdisziplin
48. Auszeit nehmen
49. Wohlbefinden am Arbeitsplatz
50. Urlaub
51. Stress vermeiden
52. Statussymbol Stress
53. Lebensplanung

Price:

Find More Eustress Products

  • Share/Bookmark

Tags: , , , , , , ,

ART OF STRESS-FREE LIVING

ART OF STRESS-FREE LIVING

ART OF STRESS-FREE LIVING

Art of Stress-free Living: Eastern and Western Approach is a practical guide that combines various stress treatment approaches that have been recognized for centuries by faith healers and meditation experts, and are now accepted by modern medical practitioners. This is the first book of its kind, combining ancient Eastern wisdom and modern Western scientific knowledge.

“Art of Stress-free Living” can save you from going to expensive seminars and other programs offered in physicians’ offices, spas, schools or retirement centers. You don’t need to go to an ashram in India or University “wellness” centers; because this book provides various relaxation techniques that you will be able to follow yourself.

What is called “Sudarshan Kriya” by new age gurus is a cycle of breaths—long, medium and short. Not only breathing patterns influence our emotions, the breath is in the present and is used to “rope in the wandering mind” that oscillates wildly between the past and the future. Like Zen masters who teach that the present moment is a chink opening into eternity, this guide describes in detail “THE POWER OF NOW- ZEN BUDDHISM APPROACH.”

This guide also takes into account the positive (pre-distress) aspects of stress.

The introduction to “Art of Stress-free Living” starts with a quote by Dr. Redford Williams, Duke University: “Diet and exercise alone are like a two-legged stool. It’s more stable with the third leg, stress management.” However, the author goes even further that for healthy heart stress management is even more important than weight control and lower cholesterol. He observes that his stressed friends who were not overweight, had normal cholesterol ended up with bypass surgery, whereas those who are overweight but with low stress level did not need bypass surgery so far (in their mid-sixties now). He provides various studies and statistics on “high cost of stress” in terms of health as well as wealth. The studies show sixty to 90 percent of all doctor visits involve stress-related complaints.

The book consists of six chapters each representing an independent topic: chapter 1, Mind-Body Connection; Chapter 2, Stress Management Approaches; Chapter 3, Mental Relaxation Approaches to Stress; Chapter 4, How Breathing Affects Stress; Chapter 5, The Value of Spiritual Living; Chapter 6, The Power of Now: Zen Buddhism Approach. The chapters precede by introduction, and are followed by Glossary, References, Notes, and Information ‘About the Author’.

After establishing mind-body connection in chapter 1, the next chapters 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 cover various approaches to stress management. However, before dealing with purely stress-management approaches, author does discuss in chapter 2 various sources of stress and stress symptoms. This chapter also gives a graph where you can determine your stress-level.

In addition to common sense approaches to routine stress, under specific stress-management approaches are discussed “Medical Approaches” and “Non-Medical alternatives.” Nutritional approach, exercise, sleep, a change of routine, financial planning, and communication are among various other means of handling stress. The author introduces relaxation techniques to be followed in detail later in the next chapters.

The author is uniquely qualified to present a synthesis of Eastern and Western stress-management approaches. He has an advanced degree in life sciences and molecular biology from the West, and a fascination with yoga, breathing and spirituality from the East, crafted out of studies at Yale University in the USA, and Punjab University in India. He has published over 10 books and 40 research papers, and has expressed his views in the news media and workshops.Art of Stress-free Living: Eastern and Western Approach is a practical guide that combines various stress treatment approaches that have been recognized for centuries by faith healers and meditation experts, and are now accepted by modern medical practitioners. This is the first book of its kind, combining ancient Eastern wisdom and modern Western scientific knowledge.

“Art of Stress-free Living” can save you from going to expensive seminars and other programs offered in physicians’ offices, spas, schools or retirement centers. You don’t need to go to an ashram in India or University “wellness” centers; because this book provides various relaxation techniques that you will be able to follow yourself.

What is called “Sudarshan Kriya” by new age gurus is a cycle of breaths—long, medium and short. Not only breathing patterns influence our emotions, the breath is in the present and is used to “rope in the wandering mind” that oscillates wildly between the past and the future. Like Zen masters who teach that the present moment is a chink opening into eternity, this guide describes in detail “THE POWER OF NOW- ZEN BUDDHISM APPROACH.”

This guide also takes into account the positive (pre-distress) aspects of stress.

The introduction to “Art of Stress-free Living” starts with a quote by Dr. Redford Williams, Duke University: “Diet and exercise alone are like a two-legged stool. It’s more stable with the third leg, stress management.” However, the author goes even further that for healthy heart stress management is even more important than weight control and lower cholesterol. He observes that his stressed friends who were not overweight, had normal cholesterol ended up with bypass surgery, whereas those who are overweight but with low stress level did not need bypass surgery so far (in their mid-sixties now). He provides various studies and statistics on “high cost of stress” in terms of health as well as wealth. The studies show sixty to 90 percent of all doctor visits involve stress-related complaints.

The book consists of six chapters each representing an independent topic: chapter 1, Mind-Body Connection; Chapter 2, Stress Management Approaches; Chapter 3, Mental Relaxation Approaches to Stress; Chapter 4, How Breathing Affects Stress; Chapter 5, The Value of Spiritual Living; Chapter 6, The Power of Now: Zen Buddhism Approach. The chapters precede by introduction, and are followed by Glossary, References, Notes, and Information ‘About the Author’.

After establishing mind-body connection in chapter 1, the next chapters 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 cover various approaches to stress management. However, before dealing with purely stress-management approaches, author does discuss in chapter 2 various sources of stress and stress symptoms. This chapter also gives a graph where you can determine your stress-level.

In addition to common sense approaches to routine stress, under specific stress-management approaches are discussed “Medical Approaches” and “Non-Medical alternatives.” Nutritional approach, exercise, sleep, a change of routine, financial planning, and communication are among various other means of handling stress. The author introduces relaxation techniques to be followed in detail later in the next chapters.

The author is uniquely qualified to present a synthesis of Eastern and Western stress-management approaches. He has an advanced degree in life sciences and molecular biology from the West, and a fascination with yoga, breathing and spirituality from the East, crafted out of studies at Yale University in the USA, and Punjab University in India. He has published over 10 books and 40 research papers, and has expressed his views in the news media and workshops.

List Price: $ 4.99

Price:

Related Eustress Products

  • Share/Bookmark

Tags: ,

Psychological Eustress: An Exploratory Regulated Process: An empirical examination of positive stress – what it looks like and how to foster it Reviews

Psychological Eustress: An Exploratory Regulated Process: An empirical examination of positive stress – what it looks like and how to foster it

Psychological Eustress: An Exploratory Regulated Process: An empirical examination of positive stress - what it looks like and how to foster it

When we think of stress we typically put a negative spin on it. In its everyday usage stress is thought of as a negative emotional state, shaped by harm, loss, and threat. This is certainly true of distress, the bad stress, which has been profusely researched. It is well understood that psychological principles, such as appraisal, are involved in stress, not to mention that distress is regulated by coping. But there is no escaping stress. To live is to stress. Life in and of itself places numerous demands on the human response system. Based on this premise there is more to life than coping and dealing with distress; there is fun, laughter, play, learning, exploration and growth. By necessity the positive aspects of life place demands on the human response system, too. Hence the infamous eustress, the good stress, which tells a tale of exploration and mastery. There are limited empirical investigations that bring to light the psychological make-up of eustress; the current research is one of the first. So what is psychological eustress and how is it regulated or fostered? This manuscript empirically examines this question. Enjoy!

List Price: $ 79.00

Price: $ 51.99

More Eustress Products

  • Share/Bookmark

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Eustress For Athletes

Eustress is the positive form of stress, it is the type of stress that brings our body to the next level of endurance and eustress-for-athletesperformance. It is interesting to note the effects on the body and to understand why eustress exists. It releases hormones into the body that propels us into action. It is important to note that is has a mental effect as well.  Eustress is usually related to enjoyable events in ones life. This is the major factor that separates it from distress (negative stress). It is applied when it is needed and the mind determines that. The stress response of eustress is different for this very reason. For example eustress supports us when we meet new challenges, have large family gatherings we need to prepare for, marriage, and having sex. We will focus on the physical form of eustress.

Eustress helps with strength and endurance

Eustress helps us win races, it helps us weight train, it helps us with endurance training. As said above it release hormones and chemicals in the body which jump start us into action. It also maintains these levels in a healthy balance. Distress on the other hand spikes these chemicals and hormones to a much higher level that is harmful to the body. Distress also, over time, can lead to deviating health conditions. It will lead to deadly conditions in many ways and make us much more susceptible to many viruses.

Hans Selye was a great stress scientist

Eustress is a term coined by Hans Selye in 1975. He is one of the most famous and respected scientists in the field of stress. He said that the body adapts to this stress, by choice, and lets it work for us in a sustainable and efficient way. Our body is a fine tuned, balanced, and a beautiful masterpiece of nature. Stress is there to help us in times of need as are many other biological functions. Pay attention to your body and how it feels. Try to not over exert yourself and focus on maintaining balance. Interval training is a popular method among athletes to improve endurance and strength. It isn’t the best for our bodies and make sure you don’t push yourself to hard. Stretching before and after this training and following a healthy diet will help much to this end.

  • Share/Bookmark

Tags: , , , , , ,

Stress Management With Herbal Medicine

Stress management is something we do both actively and passively. We gain skills to use in the face of stress and we develop ways to relieve stress when no stressors are present.  Some of us use pharmaceuticals to calm down like Xannax or Valium.  Others prefer to use natural remedies such as Rhodiola or ginseng.  In this article we will discuss natural medicines to use as a stress reducer.stress-management-medicine

Rhodiola

Rhodiola is though to be the master adaptogen.  An adaptogen is an herb that is said to increase resistance to stress, anxiety, fatigue, and trauma.  One method of action they are thought to use is balancing endocrine hormones and the immune system.  If you are in excess or deficient in these the herb will lower or rise the hormones to balance their levels.  It is also said that Rhodiola functions at the allostasis level which is a far more dynamic way of dealing with long term stress.  In addition to this studies have shown that it improves mood and can alleviate depression.  It has also shown to improve physical and mental performances.

Ginseng

Ginseng comes in many genus, the most common being:  Siberian, Panax, American, and Red.  Ginseng has traditionally been used as an adaptogen, aphrodisiac, stimulant, type II diabetes, and for the reduction of stress.  One study shows that is promising when used to increase overall quality of life.

Holy Basil

Holy Basil is becoming popular for use as a stress reducer and for mood support.  In Ayurvedic medicine it is said to be an adaptogen and is helpful is relieving stress.  It is a highly respected plant as is referred to as “the elixir of life”.  Tulsi Tea which can be bought at many health food stores has holy basil in all of its blends.  Many people I have talked to regard it as the best supplement they have taken for emotional well being and as a stress reducer.  I feel the same way, for me it works great and helps my stress management to be easy and thoughtful.

Although studies aren’t extensive for these medicines many have shown these and other herbs to be effective in relieving stress.  They are definitely worth a try and although we all react to medicines differently we should be able to find ones that work for us.  Stress management can certainly be improved with the use of medicines and it definitely is worth the time to find what works for you.

  • Share/Bookmark

Tags: , , , ,

Common Everyday Tasks Used for Stress Reduction

going-for-a-walkStress is something that’s always around us. Almost everything you do in life has the ability to cause some kind of stress, whether it’s mentally or physically, and there isn’t much you can do to completely avoid the main stressors in your life – most of them are there and there for good. You can however control how you manage your stress, and in fact there are plenty of everyday common activities that are extremely useful in stress reduction. Here are just a few.

Enjoy a Casual Stroll Through the Park or Your Neighborhood

You’d be amazed at how much a little bit of light walking can do lighten your mood. When you’re feeling a little (or very) stressed from work, or just feel a little overwhelmed drop what you’re doing and take a 5-10 minute walk. Whatever you were doing before can wait and will be there when you come back. Try to enjoy your walk; look around, observe what’s going on around you. Smell the fresh air and walk somewhere you’ve never walked before. As a stress reducer a leisure walk is very efficient, and in some cases can completely eliminate your stress.

Take a Bath

Society is becoming more and more fast-paced, and because of this people want to spend as little time as possible doing non-work related things, such as bathing. While showering is just as effective at keeping you clean than taking a bath, taking a bath has one main advantage that you don’t get from showering – stress reduction. Take an extra 10 or 20 minutes out of your day and fill up your tub and just lay in there. Lay in there and think about your day, or don’t if you don’t want to. Some people like to close their eyes and just relax, that’s fine too.

Sleeping

Sleep is one of the most often overlooked stress reducers, and probably also one of the most efficient. Something as simple as sleeping can completely eliminate your stress. Lack of sleep is actually a very common cause of stress, and if consistently done and lead to many more serious problems. Try to get about 8 hours of uninterrupted sleep every night. You’ll find yourself full of energy during the day, and you’ll also find yourself in a much better mood overall. You’d be surprised to see how important sleep is to keeping a stress free life.

  • Share/Bookmark

Tags: , , ,

Eustress-ercise Your Stress Away!

Exercise is a word that wouldn’t be used in a natural state. We would get all the exercise we need and more living naturally. The benefits wouldn’t be benefits they would just be a way of life. Health would be at an optimum level; peace of mind and happiness would be second nature to us. However almost all of us live in the “real world” and are constricted to office/sedentary jobs. We are immersed in the chaos of life and finding time to exercise can prove challenging. It is very important, not just as a stress management activity but for your general health and well-being.exercise-your-stress-away

Getting healthy and enjoy the benefits

Jogging, swimming, yoga, rock climbing, backpacking, kayaking, playing sports, pilates, dance, and many more choices are yours. Exercise is great for stress relief, mental clarity, and emotional balance. The benefits definitely don’t end there and I feel the benefits received are much more than the effort exerted. Exercising can be fun and it doesn’t have to be hard. Finding or reconnecting with a way to exercise that you enjoy should be a focus of yours if you want all these benefits.

Getting started

In our western culture we want a magic pill to take, the cure all. We want instant gratification and the simple truth is that it’s hard to come by. Continued effort yields great results and a focused mind will bring this to you. Getting into an exercising schedule is the hardest part. Once you are in the groove then it becomes nearly seamless. You just do it. Trying joining a group that exercises, like an intramural sports team or a trail runners group. Find a friend that exercises regularly or wants to start as well. When you miss a workout you feel the difference and want to do it. If you can get over the obstacle of beginning it is easy sailing from there. It will of course still take your effort but it will come so naturally.

Get the most out of it!

Take your exercise to a new level and implement stress relief and stress management techniques into the workout. Meditate as you run to a phrase such as “I am in control of my life” or “stress has no power over me”. Mediate on your breathing, keeping it steady and as deep as possible while exercising, be without thought. Being fit is your choice and it always will be. Find the exercise that will be your most enjoyable stress management activity. Exercising is something nature never intended us to be separate from.  Reconnect with yourself and workout!

  • Share/Bookmark

Tags: , , , , ,

Using Yoga for Stress Relief

Yoga StretchSeveral people looking for a way to combine relaxation with exercise turn to yoga as a perfect balance of the two.  Many people enjoy yoga because it gives them the relaxation they need after being stressed.  I spoke with a professor and long time advocate for yoga about the activity and she said she started doing it because she was looking for a total body exercise.  Even after a lifetime of activity in tennis, cycling and modern dance, yoga has improved her flexibility.

What is yoga?

Yoga is a form of exercise that focuses on individual abilities within different poses, each of which have different goals, like strength building, toning, or flexibility.  People who participate are encouraged to modify each pose to their own ability and avoid pushing themselves into something that is uncomfortable or impossible for them to do.  Practicing yoga will not only help you with your flexibility, but also with your breathing.  The combination of the two can greatly reduce pain as you grow older and reduce stress as well! Yoga can also have effects beyond simple fitness benefits and can help a person improve their life in general.

Yoga and stress relief

One of the best benefits of yoga is its ability to help you clear your mind.  As we rush about our days, we are constantly reminded of all the things we need to get done, racing from one thought process to another.  We need a break from this routine, and yoga can provide that for you.  Practice breathing deeply, this will help you concentrate on the activity at mind – breathing – and not hundreds of other thoughts that keep you worried all day long.  This also acts as a form of meditation and provides that mental break that you have been looking for.  Contrary to popular belief, yoga can actually be a physically demanding activity that is great for your cardiovascular system!  Holding poses and stretches for extended periods of time really puts a lot of stress and strain into stretching those muscles out to be good and healthy!  This also raises your heart rate and causes the need for oxygen to increase!  In this natural sense, yoga has proven for centuries to increase cardiovascular health and overall well being.

Is yoga for you?

Yes! People who practice yoga on a regular basis often report that it has helped them become a more compassionate person.  It is very calming and there is also that space where you can reflect on things that you have time to contemplate.  Anyone can do yoga, you just need to find the right teacher and approach it with the right attitude.  Yoga is for everybody, you just have to keep doing it and listen to and respect your body while you do it.  Use your intelligence and never give up.  Having the right attitude when attempting anything new that will require a schedule in life takes great mental strength, here at Stressreducer.org we encourage you to find this strength and better yourself!

So do yourself a favor and reduce your stress by taking up yoga.  Nobody has ever regretted it. Click this link to find yoga classes happening near you!

  • Share/Bookmark

Tags: , , ,

Powered by WP Robot